Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

How to Certify and Become a Licensed Utah Pesticide Applicator

Pay for Pesticide Applicator license here

Utah has three (3) classifications of Pesticide Applicators: 

  1. Commercial - Any person who uses any pesticide for hire or compensation. A Commercial Pesticide Applicator must be affiliated with a Commercial Pesticide Business before they can receive their license. 
  2. Non-Commercial - Any person working as an individual or an employee of a firm, entity, or government agency who uses or demonstrates the use of any restricted-use pesticide and who does not qualify as a private or commercial applicator. 
  3. Private - Any person or his employer who uses or supervises the use of any restricted-use pesticide for the purpose of producing any agricultural commodity on property owned or rented by him or his employer. 

Applicators are categorized in one or more of the categories defined below, based on the application site and the type of work they perform.  

  1. Agriculture 
    (a) Plant - Applicators using pesticides to control pests in the production of agricultural crops. 
    (b) Animal - Applicators using pesticides on animals or places which animals inhabit.

  2. Forest - Applicators using pesticides in forests, forest nurseries, or forest seed producing areas. 

  3. Ornamental and Turf - Applicators using pesticides to control pests in the maintenance and production of ornamental trees, shrubs, flowers and turf; also pests around sidewalks, driveways and other similar locations.
     
  4. Seed Treatment - Applicators using pesticides on seeds.

  5. Aquatic 
    (a) Surface Water - Applicators applying pesticides to standing or running water, excluding public health-related activities. 
    (b) Sewer Root Control - Applicators using pesticides to control roots in sewers or in related systems.

  6. Right-Of-Way - Applicators using pesticides in maintaining public roads, electric power lines, pipelines, railway rights-of-way, or other similar areas. 

  7. Structural and Health-Related - Applicators using pesticides in, on or around food handling establishments, human dwellings, institutions such as schools, hospitals, industrial establishments, warehouses, storage units and any other structures and adjacent areas public or private to control household pests, fabric pests, stored-products pests, and vertebrate pests.

  8. Public Health - State, federal or other government employees, or persons working under their supervision using, or supervising the use of, restricted-use pesticides in public health programs for control of pests having medical and public health importance.

  9. Regulatory - Limited to state and federal employees, or persons under their direct supervision, who apply pesticides in a mechanical ejection device, a protective collar, or other methods to control regulated pests. There are two subcategories: 
    (a) This category is limited to state and federal, employees or persons under their direct supervision, who apply pesticides in a mechanical ejection device, or other methods to control regulated pests. 
    (b) This category is limited to state and federal, employees or persons under their direct supervision, who apply pesticides in a protective collar, or other methods to control regulated pests. 

  10. Demonstration, Consultation and Research - Individuals who demonstrate to the public the proper use, techniques, benefits, and methods of restricted-use pesticides. Also persons conducting field research with restricted-use pesticides. In addition they shall meet the specific standards applicable to their particular activity.

  11. Aerial Application - Applicators applying pesticides by aircraft. Aerial applicators are also required to certify in categories of intended application and present a valid pilot’s license.

  12. Vertebrate - Applicators applying pesticides in the control of vertebrate pests.

  13. Fumigation/Stored Commodities - Applicators using fumigants to control pests in soil, structures, railroad cars, stored grains, manufactured products, grain elevators, flour mills, similar areas and items.

  14. Wood-Preservation - Applicators who apply wood-preservative pesticides to wood products such as fence posts, electrical poles, railroad ties or any other form of wood products.

  15. Wood-Destroying Organisms - Applicators using pesticides to control termites, carpenter ants, wood-boring or tunneling insects, bees, wasps, wood decaying fungi and any other pests destroying wood products.  

Commercial and Non-Commercial Applicators must take the general/core exam and at least one category test (listed above). The categories tests should be in the classification for which they will be applying pesticides in their business, or employment. All exams and tests must be passed with a minimum score of 70%. Applicators may certify in any category, except they must meet the special qualifications for aerial and demonstration categories. Only UDAF designated officials of the federal and state government can certify in the regulatory category. 

Commercial Applicators are required to pay $65.00 for a 3 year license. Non-Commercial and Private Applicators are required to pay $20 for a 3 year license. Licenses obtained between November 1 and December 31 will be valid for the following three years. Licenses obtained outside of that period (11/1 to 12/31) will be valid for the year they are obtained and the following two years. All fees must be paid before testing can begin. A check should be made out to the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF). MasterCard, Visa, Discover or American Express payments will be accepted in the Salt Lake City office, or by phone (801-538-7185). Cash payments will only be accepted in the Salt Lake City office and should be for the exact amount. A $15.00 fee will be charged for any replacement license (including re-prints for a change of address or similar request). 

Study materials are available at the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food-Pesticide page:  http://ag.utah.gov/pesticides.html

It is recommended that the information  be studied thoroughly. When you are ready to take the tests, make an appointment at the testing center nearest you.   A list of testing centers are available on the website listed above.   Appointments are recommended. Walk-ins are taken only according to the testing centers policy.   Most testing centers charge $10.00, some more, for testing at their facility.  Be prepared to pay this by cash, or check, as few accept credit cards.

While testing; scratch paper, pencil and a calculator will be provided; you will not be allowed to use your own. Cellphones should be left in a vehicle, or otherwise stored and not brought with you to the test. Use of a cellphone during a testing is grounds for failing. You should allow yourself a minimum of 3 hours for testing, perhaps longer if you have more than one category. All tests are 50 question tests.   All tests are administered according to the testing centers policies and rules.   Make sure you understand what they expect as far as time, items allowed, etc...

The Test Administrator will not be allowed to discuss any of the answers with you if you fail any of the tests, but they may help you with suggestions of what to study. 

With a test score of 65% - 69%, a test may be retaken the same day (Subject to UDAF testing schedule). If the score is below 65% the recipient must wait 3 days before retaking the test. Testers are allowed three times to pass a test. After the third attempt the applicant must wait 14 days and pay $15 retest fee for each test failed over three times. The retest fee allows for two more attempts. After 7 attempts, if the exam is not passed, the certification fee must be paid again and the process starts over. Candidates have 60 days to pass all required exams. After 60 days the certification fee must be paid again and the testing process started over, regardless of previous results. 

Private Applicators are allowed to take an open book exam, which consists of a 50 question Private Applicator Examination.  This test is not usually administered at a testing center - the test is usually given by a UDAF employee, or an USU Extension Service Office.   A score of 70% or above is required to pass the test. The same waiting periods and pass/fail requirements apply to this testing as discussed above for commercial and non-commercial applicators. The Private Applicator must take the Aerial Application Category and/or the Fumigation Category (categories are described above) if those categories will apply to the Private Applicator’s operations and application methods. Licenses obtained between November 1 and December 31 will be valid for the following three years. Licenses obtained outside of that period (11/1 to 12/31) will be valid for the year they are obtained and the following two years. 

 

Pesticide Applicator Licensing

Understanding Investigations & Enforcement

Testing Center Locations