Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

Performance Management Plan

WRITING PERFORMANCE PLANS THAT ARE MEANINGFUL TO EMPLOYEES AND DEFENSIBLE AT EVALUATION TIME
September 21, 2015

(This guidance is based on using the Utah Performance Management system for writing performance plans and evaluations.) 

1. Develop “goals” consistent with the division’s mission and the team’s responsibilities that are job related and represent major duties of the job.

Example “goal” for a Front Desk Receptionist:

• Interaction with the Public

2. Understand what the goal elements of the Utah Performance Management system are asking for.

 “Expectations” (What)

• Answer the question, “What is the employee to accomplish?”
• Focus on and describe the outcome the supervisor wants
• Support organizational goals
• Relate directly to required job skills and define how they will be utilized

Example “expectations” for a Front Desk Receptionist for the “goal” of “Interaction with the Public”:

1. Greet individuals who come to the administration building’s front desk area.

2. Receive mail and other deliveries to the administration building’s front desk area. 

“Strategies” (How)

• Answer the question, “How will the employee perform their job tasks in order to meet job expectations, and how will the result be measured?”
• Start with a verb
• Are capable of being measured or observed
• Describe and illustrate work performance at the pass or successful, exceptional, etc. levels
• Focus on one or more of the following areas:

- Qualitative - How well, how accurately, how thoroughly is a task to be done?
- Quantitative - How much, how many of something is the employee to do?
- Timeliness - How fast is the employee to complete tasks?
- Work Behavior - In what manner is the employee to complete tasks?

Example “strategies” for a Front Desk Receptionist which relate to the above examples of “expectations:”

1. Smile at each individual who approaches the front desk area and use a pleasant tone of voice when communicating with them.

2. Date stamp all pieces of mail or other deliveries received at the front desk before distributing them to the proper areas and employees.
 
“Support Required”

• The employee identifies the support, information, or resources needed from the supervisor or others in order to meet the expectations.

Examples of “support required” that the Front Desk Receptionist may request:

1. Orient the front desk and my chair so I can see individuals coming into the administration building.

2. Provide me with a properly functioning date stamp.
 
“Expected Outcomes” (job output measures)

• How the employee will be evaluated; the actual employee performance or products produced throughout the performance year.

• As you write performance plan “strategies” (how the employee is to complete tasks), ask yourself: “What documents, observations, or other means will I use to evaluate or measure the expected outcomes to see if they meet the ‘expectations’ and ‘strategies’ in the plan?”
• Examples of ways to evaluate employee performance:

- Case records
- Statistical reports
- Other data
- Observations
- The employee-supervisor meeting
- Supervisor log, notebook, or file
- Surveys
- Spot checks of work production

Examples of “expected outcomes” a supervisor might use to measure or determine if the above expectations and strategies were met by the Front Desk Receptionist:

1. Observe whether the employee is greeting individuals who approach the front desk area with a smile and a pleasant tone of voice when communicating with them.

2. Spot check pieces of mail or other deliveries to the front desk to see if they are date stamped before distributing them to the proper areas and employees.

3. Make sure performance plans and evaluations comply with the DHRM Rules at R477-10, on Employee Development.

4. Write performance “expectations” and “strategies” that are clear, achievable, and measurable.

5. Use “expected outcomes” (job output measures) that can document how or why employees did or did not meet performance expectations.

 

 

 

 

 

posted: Sept. 29, 2015