Utah Department of Agriculture and Food

 Import Permits

  • Animal Import Permits - Online
  • Animal Import Permits - Telephone
    • Business Hours: (801) 538-7164 (Monday-Friday 7:30 AM - 5 PM, Mountain Time)
    • After hours, holidays, weekends:
      • (801)  520-4311 Dr. Erickson
      • (801)  699-0628 Dr. Heward

 

Commuter Permits

 

Animal Import Requirements

 

You can also refer to the InterstateLivestock.com web site for other state requirements - in addition to Utah.

 

General Import Requirements

Utah is a class free state for brucellosis, tuberculosis, Salmonella pullorum and scabies, and Stage V pseudorabies.

All animals entering Utah must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate), except for animals consigned directly to an inspected slaughter establishment or approved auction market, which need only a Brand Inspection Certificate. A Brand Inspection Certificate is required on all cattle, equine, and elk.

Entry permits obtained prior to shipment are required on all cattle, swine, sheep and goats, poultry, game and furbearing animals, zoo animals, birds (including Ratites), and other exotic or wild animals (including Elk and Bison), unless consigned directly to an inspected slaughter establishment or approved auction market.

Import permits and other current information may be obtained by calling (801) 538-7164 between 7:30 AM and 5:00 PM Mountain Time, Monday thru Friday.

After hours, weekends, and holidays call or (801) 520-4311 or (801) 699-0628

 

VESICULAR STOMATITIS STATEMENT

Any livestock (equine, bovine, porcine, caprine, ovine, or cervidae) entering Utah from a county where vesicular stomatitis has been diagnosed within the last fourteen (14) days or a county that contains a premises quarantined for vesicular stomatitis shall be accompanied by a certificate of veterinary inspection dated within fourteen 14 days of entry containing the following statement: "All animals identified on this certificate of veterinary inspection have been inspected and found to be free from clinical signs of vesicular stomatitis."

 

Other Agencies

The following agencies may also have requirements for holding, selling, breeding, or importing wildlife and exotic species:

 

Aquatic Animals or Aquaculture Products

An import permit is required to import live aquatic animals or their eggs into Utah from any location outside the state. This permit is in addition to the COR for operation of the facility. Import permits may be obtained by contacting the UDAF Fish Health Program at (801) 538-7046 and providing the following information:

  1. Name, address, phone number and COR number of importer.
  2. Species, size and/or number of aquatic animals or eggs to be imported.
  3. Name and health approval number of sources, origin of aquatic animals/eggs, transfer history, and approximate date of shipment.
  4. For international shipments, a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate) from the source must be obtained by the importer indicating that known nuisance species are not found in the water source.

 

All shipments of live aquatic animals must originate from sources that have been approved by UDAF and assigned a fish health approval number. A list of approved sources is maintained by UDAF, and may be obtained by contacting the UDAF Fish Health Program at (801) 538-7046.

For more detailed information about importation of aquatic animals, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-17, Aquaculture and Aquatic Animal Health.

Cats, Dogs and Ferrets

All dogs, cats and ferrets shall be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate). Animals over three months of age must have a current vaccination against rabies. The date of vaccination, name of product used, and expiration date must be listed on Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate). Puppies and kittens should not be imported until at least 8 weeks of age unless accompanied by the mother.

Cattle and Bison

All cattle entering Utah, except those going directly to an inspected slaughter establishment or approved auction market, require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit
  3. Brand inspection certificate
  4. Female cattle entering Utah must be officially calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis and have recognized tattoos or a negative brucellosis (Brucella abortus) test within 30 days.
  5. Negative brucellosis test within 30 days on bulls 12 months or older and females 24 months or older is required for all cattle originating from a brucellosis designated surveillance area.
  6. Negative tuberculosis test is required within 60 days prior to shipment for dairy cattle two months or older, rodeo bulls, roping steers, and cattle coming from an area that is not declared free of tuberculosis.
  7. Bulls 12 months of age and over, entering Utah require a negative trichomoniasis test (three (3) cultures or 1 PCR) within 30 days prior to entry or since exposure to female cattle. Bulls for slaughter, rodeo, exhibition, and those kept in confinement are not required to be tested for trichomoniasis.

 

Bison entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit
  3. A negative tuberculosis test within 60 days prior to entry (over 6 months of age).
  4. A negative brucellosis test within 30 days prior to entry (over 12 months of age).
  5. Females over 4 months of age must be officially calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis and have legible tattoos or a negative brucellosis (Brucella abortus) test within 30 days.
  6. Bulls 12 months of age and over, entering Utah require a negative trichomoniasis test (three (3) cultures or 1 PCR) within 30 days prior to entry or since exposure to female cattle.

 

All cattle and bison must carry some form of individual identification, such as a brand registered with an official brand agency, or an official ear tag or registration tattoo. Identification must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Official individual identification used for testing purposes must be shown on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or attached to each copy of the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The import permit number must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. This includes exhibition cattle.

For more detailed information about importation of cattle and bison, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-1, Admission and Inspection of Livestock, Poultry and Other Animals.

Cervidae (elk and deer)

All captive elk imported into Utah shall originate from states which have implemented a program for surveillance, control, and eradication of CWD in captive cervids, and must originate from herds that have been participating in a verified CWD surveillance program for a minimum of 5 years.

Privately captive cervids entering Utah require the following:

  1. A prior Elk Farms and Elk Hunting Parks with the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food
  2. No captive cervids imported into Utah can originate east of the 100th meridian.
  3. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  4. Import permit
  5. Proof of ownership or elk brand inspection
  6. Two negative tuberculosis tests conducted not less than 90 days apart except elk under six months of age accompanied by a negative testing dam, or elk originating from an accredited, qualified, or monitored herd, in which case a single negative test within 60 days of entry into the state is acceptable.
  7. A negative brucellosis test run by at least two types of official brucellosis testing is required on all animals six months of age or older within thirty (30) days prior to entry.
  8. The following signed statement must appear on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection: "To the best of my knowledge the captive cervids listed herein are not infected with Johne's disease (Paratuberculosis), Chronic Wasting Disease, or Malignant Catarrhal Fever and have never been east of the 100 degree meridian."
  9. The herd of origin must have performed monitoring for Chronic Wasting Disease at least equal to the Utah herd.

 

Elk semen, eggs, or gametes imported to Utah require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection stating:

"The source animal(s) have been tested for genetic purity for Rocky Mountain Elk genes and have never resided on a premise where CWD has been identified."

For more detailed information about importation of captive cervids, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-18, Elk Farming, and Administrative Rule R58-20, Domesticated Elk Hunting Parks.

Equidae (Horses, Mules, Donkeys and Asses)

All equids entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. A negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) (Coggins or ELISA) test within past 12 months.
  3. Proof of ownership, or brand inspection certificate
  4. Equine semen requires an Entry Permit as well as a negative EVA test.

 

NOTE: Stallions no longer require EVA testing or a permit.

Horses, mules and asses may be imported into the State of Utah when accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The certificate must state that the equine animals described were examined on the date indicated and found free from symptoms of any infectious or communicable disease such as vesicular stomatitis. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must show a negative EIA test within one year prior to the time the certificate was issued. Utah horses returning to Utah as part of a commuter livestock shipment are exempted from the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection requirements; however, a valid Utah horse travel permit is required for re-entering Utah.

Exotics

Exotic animals are considered rare or unusual animal pets or an animal, not commonly thought of as a pet, kept within a human household. Rodents, reptiles, and amphibians are considered exotic animals. Exotic animals entering Utah shall be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate).

Game and Fur-Bearing Animals

Game and fur bearing animals entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import Permit
  3. Certificate of Registration from the Division of Wildlife Resources as required

 

Camelids (camels, llamas, alpacas, vicunas, guanacos)

Llamas and other camelids entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import Permit
  3. A negative brucellosis test within 30 days
  4. A negative tuberculosis test within 60 days

 

Goats

Meat goats require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import Permit
  3. Compliance with Federal Scrapie identification requirements

 

Dairy goats require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import Permit
  3. Negative brucellosis test within 30 days (over 6 months of age).
  4. Negative tuberculosis test within 60 days (over 6 months of age).
  5. Compliance with Federal Scrapie identification requirements

 

Dairy goats and camelids entering Utah for exhibition purposes only are exempt from the testing requirements.

For more detailed information about importation of goats and camelids, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-1, Admission and Inspection of Livestock, Poultry and Other Animals.

Poultry and Game Birds

All avian imported into the state of Utah are required to be tested for Avian Influenza

Poultry means all domesticated fowl, including chickens, turkeys, waterfowl, ratites, and game birds, except doves and pigeons, which are bred for the primary purpose of producing eggs or meat.

All poultry entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate) or National Poultry Improvement Plan VS Form 9-3
  2. Import permit
  3. Current NPIP number
  4. If no NPIP number, then a negative blood test for salmonella pullorum within the last 30 days is required

 

For more detailed information about importation of poultry and game birds, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-6, Poultry.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources individuals who desire to hold live game birds for more than 60 days to apply for and receive a Certificate of Registration (COR) for an aviculture installation prior to receiving the birds.

Psittacine and Passerine Birds and Raptors

Psittacine and passerine birds and raptors entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit

 

The number and kinds of birds to be shipped into Utah, their origin, date to be shipped and destination should be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

Ratites (ostriches, emu and rheas)

Ratites entering Utah require the following unless consigned directly to a slaughter establishment:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit
  3. A current NPIP number, or
  4. If no NPIP number, then a negative blood test for salmonella pullorum within the last 30 days is required
  5. Ivomec injection or treatment for external parasites

 

For more detailed information about importation of ratites, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-6, Poultry.

Sheep

Sheep entering Utah must have:

  • Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  • The following signed statement must appear on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection: "No sheep in the flock are exhibiting clinical signs of blue tongue or foot rot."
  • Import permit
  • Compliance with Federal Scrapie identification requirements
  • Breeding rams six months of age or older shall test negative for Brucella ovis within 30 days of entry. Rams entering for exhibition purposes are exempt from testing

 

Contact the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources for requirements for holding or breeding non-domestic breeds of sheep and goats.

For more detailed information about importation of domestic sheep, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-1, Admission and Inspection of Livestock, Poultry and Other Animals.

Swine

Breeding and Exhibition swine over three months of age entering Utah require the following:

  1. The following signed statement must appear on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection: "Swine have not been fed raw garbage. To the best of my knowledge, swine represented on this certificate have not, within the past 30 days, originated from premises known to be affected by Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv) and have not been exposed to PEDv.
  2. Show individual identification.
  3. Import permit

 
For more detailed information about importation of swine, see the full text of Administrative Rule R58-1, Admission and Inspection of Livestock, Poultry and Other Animals.

Wildlife

Wildlife entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit
  3. Certificate of Registration(COR)from the Division of Wildlife Resources as required

 

It is unlawful for any person to import into or export from the state of Utah any species of live native or exotic wildlife or to possess or release from captivity any such imported live wildlife except as shown below, or by the rules and regulations of the Utah Wildlife Board without first securing written permission from the Division of Wildlife Resources, Utah Department of Natural Resources, 1596 West North Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84116 (801) 538-4887.

All wildlife imports shall meet the same Department requirements as domestic animals.

Coyote and Raccoon Permits

It is unlawful to import, distribute, relocate or possess live raccoons or coyotes except as provided by R58-14, Holding Live Coyotes or Raccoons in Captivity.

Upon filing an application for registration with the Department of Agriculture and Food, upon a form provided by the department, a permit may be issued by the department authorizing the applicant to hold in live captivity raccoons or coyotes for research, educational, zoos, circuses, or other purposes authorized by the Department of Agriculture and Food.

Zoological Animals

Zoological animals entering Utah require the following:

  1. Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificate)
  2. Import permit

 

The entry of common zoological animals shown at exhibitions is authorized when a permit has been obtained from the Department.

Movement of zoo animals must also be in compliance with the Federal Animal Welfare Act.

Semen and Embryos

Please contact the State Veterinarian's Office for more specific information concerining various species.

  1. Elk semen, eggs, or gametes imported to Utah require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection stating: "The source animals have been tested for genetic purity for Rocky Mountain Elk genes and have never resided on premises where CWD has been identified."
  2. Semen from stallions that are carriers of Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) can only be shipped to a facility that has been approved to handle EVA positive animals and semen and requires an import permit that can be obtained from the Department by calling (801) 538-7164.

 

 

Community Animal Response Team (CART)

Secure Milk Supply Plan (SMS)


Community Animal Response Team (CART): CART provides professional preparedness response and recovery, resources and community education to ensure the health and welfare of animals before, during and after a disaster. Animals cannot be considered independently of response issues associated with human populations. Animal owners can put themselves and first responders at risk when they take risks in order to save their animals. Animal response issues exist anytime a disaster affects a community. Whether planned for or not, they must be addressed during a response.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food encourages individuals interested in preparedness and emergency response to work with their local emergency manager to include animal response planning in their county or city emergency response plans.  CART groups may be prepared to respond to everything from sheltering pets in a natural disaster evacuation scenario to an overturned livestock trailer or livestock disease outbreak.  If you are interested in starting a CART group in your area, please review the following resources to help gain a better understand of training recommendations and what is involved.

The following are examples of state-level and county-level CART programs in other states.  These should be used as examples only and permission to use information from these sites in local planning should be obtained directly from the respective organizations.

Colorado Extension Community Animal Disaster Planning Toolkit: http://extension.colostate.edu/disaster-web-sites/community-animal-disaster-planning-toolkit/

New Jersey CART: http://www.nj.gov/agriculture/animalemergency/cart/

Napa County CART: http://napacart.org/

For additional guidance, contact Chelsea Crawford, Assistant State Veterinarian at (801)538-7109. 


Secure Milk Supply Plan (SMS): The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food is in the process of creating a Secure Milk Supply Plan.  Information for producers and processors on how to participate in the Plan will be released as the project progresses.  In the meantime, implementing good biosecurity practices now will help protect your farm against potential disease introductions and prepare you for participation in the Plan.  See http://securemilksupply.org/index.php for information on farm biosecurity practices and FREE training materials for farm employees in both English and Spanish.

Secure Milk Supply – Foot and Mouth Disease Introduction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKTymApL__4&feature=youtu.be 


 

The department is having a number of displays produced that offer education material for backyard bird owners.

Below is a mock up of such a display.

 

eICVI - Electronic Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection

Electronic Interstate Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (eICVI) enable Accredited Veterinarians to do their job more efficiently. In addition, the use of electronic systems often ensures that regulatory requirements are met. 

Pros of using electronic eICVI’s:

  • Time savings & improved efficiency.
  • Multiple ID numbers can be imported into the certificate – no time spent writing out tag numbers.
  • No need for attached sheets.
  • Improved legibility and accuracy - less errors.
  • Allows for real-time information exchange.

 

Cons of using electronic eICVI’s:

  • Staff training time.
  • Learning curve.
  • Initial investment costs in technology.

  

Several eICVI products exist and others are being developed. Veterinarians should contact their State Animal Health Official to obtain references to the systems that are recognized and available within their state. Below is a summary of current products available for Utah: 


1) AgConnect mCVI (free)

  • mCVI is automatically uploaded and processed into USAHERDS within 48 hours.
  • mCVI only works on Apple and Android devices.

 

AgConnect mCVI Resources

 

 2) State of Utah eCVI (free) 

* We will post information to this web page when it is ready. *

  • A dynamic PDF form that changes its layout depending on items selected. Has drop-down menus, radio buttons, ease of use.
  • Can be emailed to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Save on mailing, postage
  • UDAF Animal Health office can upload to USAHERDS without having to re-enter the data.

 

3) GlobalVetLINK LLC - GVL (fee-based) 

  • Submits certificates to state animal health officials.
  • Certificates are uploaded into USAHERDS and automatically processed.
  • Approved for use in all 50 States
  • USDA approved digital signature technology
  • Mobile capability

 

GVL HealthLINK Training: https://youtu.be/8o73YXTAhGo
Web site: https://www.globalvetlink.com/products/healthlink/

 

4) VetSentry (fee-based) 

  • Certificates are electronically uploaded into USAHERDS and processed.
  • A PDF form with the same look and feel as the paper CVI's.
  • Easy to fill in with a standard laptop or desktop computer.
  • Automated features send completed eCVIs to state officials and the veterinarian.


Web site: http://www.vet-sentry.com/

 

5) smartICVI (fee-based) 

  • Completed CVIs electronically submitted to State Animal Health offices, clinic and other stakeholders.
  • Mobile app for your smartphone and tablet that works without an Internet connection.
  • Certificates are uploaded into USAHERDS and automatically processed.


Web site: http://www.smarticvi.com/

 

6) VSPS - Veterinary Services Process Streamlining (free) 

  • Developed and administered by USDA/APHIS.
  • Also offers online Coggins/EIA test form submission direct to laboratories.
  • Approved for use in all States.
  • Requires Level 2 eAuthentication with USDA. e-Authentication is a registration process that enables users to securely access USDA Web applications and services via the Internet.
  • To register for a Level 2 eAuthentication account click on the following link: Level 2 eAuthentication Registration

 

Website: https://vsapps.aphis.usda.gov/vsps/

 

7) USDA APHIS Form 7001 (free)

  • PDF Form 7001 (USDA APHIS)
  • Official USDA-approved form: interstate, international.
  • Free, web-based.
  • Saves on paper and postage.
  • Can be emailed to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 Horse Roping/Tripping Information

In 2015 the Utah Legislature passed H.B. 261 Substitute “Horse Tripping Amendments”; creating reporting requirements for venues holding horse roping or tripping events.

This page contains important information regarding your facility's responsibility on what to report, when to report it, and the consequences for failing to report these events.

Please access these links and let the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) know if you have any questions.

Thank you

 

Horse tripping reporting requirements

What you need to know about horse tripping events - Brochure

The information requested below is required following the passage of H.B 261